by RoesleinAE RoesleinAE

Roeslein Alternative Energy acquires Alternate Energy Resources Group

Published by Refrigerated & Frozen Foods

The two companies have been collaborating for several years on multiple projects throughout Northern Missouri.
Roeslein Alternative Energy (RAE), St. Louis, Mo., acquired Alternate Energy Resources Group (AERG), an environmental engineering and construction firm based in Corinth, Texas. The two companies have been collaborating for several years on multiple projects throughout Northern Missouri.

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by RoesleinAE RoesleinAE

Roeslein Alternative Energy Acquires AERG

As of April 1, 2019, Roeslein Alternative Energy (RAE) has acquired Alternate Energy Resources Group (AERG), an environmental engineering and construction firm, located in Texas. The two companies have been collaborating for several years on multiple projects throughout Northern Missouri. AERG’s experience and unique skill set will allow RAE to better serve its clients.

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by RAE RAE

Turning Liquid Gold Into Green Energy

Published by Ag Professional

Written by Sara Brown

On 1,000 acres in northwest Missouri, rolling fields filled with flowers and butterflies are the backdrop of a booming technology revolution on hog farms across the country. Acres of native pastures are just one part of Smithfield’s sustainability efforts to turn hog manure into biogas energy to heat homes across the country and further environmental sustainability goals at the same time.

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by RAE RAE

Smithfield and Roeslein Alternative Energy help bring monarch butterflies back in large numbers

Published by High Plains/Midwest Ag Journal

Smithfield Foods, Inc. is the first food company to participate in a new program with Environmental Defense Fund and Roeslein Alternative Energy to restore key prairie habitat for monarch butterflies, as described in this video. Their efforts are helping bring back the iconic insect, which has experienced a 95 percent population decline since the 1980s and could be listed as a threatened species in June 2019.

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by RAE RAE

Big agriculture helped destroy monarch butterfly habitats – now it’s trying to save them

Published by Fast Company
Written by Ellie Anzilotti

Over the past couple of decades, monarch butterflies, one of the most recognizable (and important) visitors to gardens across North America, have been declining in number–as much as 95% of the population has disappeared since the 1980s. The reasons are numerous: Mexico, where the pollinators migrate to escape harsh winters, has eliminated many of the trees where monarchs flock, and severe and unpredictable weather due to climate change has disrupted populations. And in the Midwest, where monarchs are most populous, farming practices that lean heavily on herbicides and pesticides are killing off native milkweed plants, where monarchs lay their eggs.

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