• By incorporating wildlife, water quality, carbon sequestration, and other eco system services in the up-front planning and consideration of biomass feed stocks, incentives could be used to encourage farmers to grow and harvest biomass for bioenergy using practices that simultaneously provide society multiple benefits 1
  • Harvesting biofuel crops from perennial and sustainable restored grasslands is possible on approximately 51 to 67 million hectares of marginal/abandoned cropland and abandoned pasture in the U.S.2
  • Recent global analyses suggest that approximately 385 million to 472 million hectare of abandoned farmland could be used to produce approximately 1.4 billion to 2.1 billion metric tons of biomass annually (Campbell et al. 2008)3
  • Restoring land to a more native condition can produce biofuels and deliver many other benefits
    • Planting more native species will allow bigger and more predictable yields while increasing the likelihood of sustained production4
  • Many of the environmental impacts of bioenergy production on agricultural fields can be minimized by low input systems with diverse native species.5
  • Let Nature do the heavy-lifting. Diverse restored grassland naturally delivers benefits that are costly inputs for human agriculture
    • Efficient Water Use
    • Efficient Energy Use
    • Efficient Nitrogen Use
    • Carbon Sequestration
  • Perennial crops can be grown in places not suited for annual crops
  • In total, NRCS is authorized to enroll more than 113 million hectares under the Conservation Title of the farm bill at an estimated cost of $2.7 billion (Fig. 4; USDA FY 2010 Budget Summary and Annual Performance Plan, pg. 71)6
  • Fuel from restored grassland biomass actually decreases the amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere making it “carbon negative”7
  • Native Prairie is capable of water absorption at rates up to eight inches of rain in an hour